Past Events

23 November 2006

99.9% of the visible material in the universe is made of quarks and yet we know surprisingly little about them. For example, the mass of the electron is known to a tiny fraction of a percent; that of the up or down quarks has a factor of two uncertainty. The reason for the difficulty is that quarks are never seen as free particles, but are inextricably bound together by the strong force that in turn holds the atomic nucleus together.

13 November 2006

99.9% of the visible material in the universe is made of quarks and yet we know surprisingly little about them. For example, the mass of the electron is known to a tiny fraction of a percent; that of the up or down quarks has a factor of two uncertainty. The reason for the difficulty is that quarks are never seen as free particles, but are inextricably bound together by the strong force that in turn holds the atomic nucleus together.

13 November 2006

99.9% of the visible material in the universe is made of quarks and yet we know surprisingly little about them. For example, the mass of the electron is known to a tiny fraction of a percent; that of the up or down quarks has a factor of two uncertainty. The reason for the difficulty is that quarks are never seen as free particles, but are inextricably bound together by the strong force that in turn holds the atomic nucleus together.

13 November 2006

99.9% of the visible material in the universe is made of quarks and yet we know surprisingly little about them. For example, the mass of the electron is known to a tiny fraction of a percent; that of the up or down quarks has a factor of two uncertainty. The reason for the difficulty is that quarks are never seen as free particles, but are inextricably bound together by the strong force that in turn holds the atomic nucleus together.

01 November 2006

Dr. Jeremy McNeil, the Helen Battle Professor in the biology department of the University of Western Ontario, studies the reproductive biology of migrating insects, as well as the interactions between insects, their natural enemies and plants. He investigates the role that naturally occurring chemicals in plants and insects play in interactions within and between different species.

18 October 2006

Dr. Jeremy McNeil, the Helen Battle Professor in the biology department of the University of Western Ontario, studies the reproductive biology of migrating insects, as well as the interactions between insects, their natural enemies and plants. He investigates the role that naturally occurring chemicals in plants and insects play in interactions within and between different species.

04 October 2006

Dr. McNeil, the Helen Battle Professor in the biology department of the University of Western Ontario, studies the reproductive biology of migrating insects, as well as the interactions between insects, their natural enemies and plants. He investigates the role that naturally occurring chemicals in plants and insects play in interactions within and between different species.

19 September 2006

Dr. Jeremy McNeil, the Helen Battle Professor in the biology department of the University of Western Ontario, studies the reproductive biology of migrating insects, as well as the interactions between insects, their natural enemies and plants. He investigates the role that naturally occurring chemicals in plants and insects play in interactions within and between different species.

03 March 2006

The Royal Society of Canada (RSC) is hosting a “Meet the New Fellows” in the Montreal Region Reception. ***

NEW FELLOWS: Jacques Derome, Tom Hudson, Ernesto Schiffrin and Michel Tremblay

25 January 2006

American Ambassador to Canada David Wilkins and former Canadian Ambassador to the United States Allan Gotlieb will visit on Wednesday January 25 to discuss relations between the two countries. The event will be moderated by TVO's Steve Paikin.

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